[CFF] live stock on the railroad

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 15 October 2019 with 2 Comments

This week, I’ve just a small project.

Many logging railroads were used for much more as hauling logs. It also brought loggers and other “passengers” into the woods as well as food and supplies to the camps. But sometimes, they also worked simple as a “common carrier”.

Along my logging empire, there are some fresh meadows and a shepherd uses the railroad to bring the young sheep out into the woods. Therefore I build some side walls from wood strips, to be used with one of my flat cars to create a “stock car”.

Bye, Gerd

[CFF] aux. tender “Moldovita” style (part2)

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 8 October 2019 with 3 Comments

Here comes the second part of this small tender car. As announced last week, I spend a sand-blast and painted the body black. Once assembled, I soon realized, that something went wrong with proportions in height.

I checked some prototype photos and soon found out, that the roof on my car is 6mm to height. So I cut it down with Dremel-tool and soldered back on in the correct height. Much better. The split wood was made from real wood and glued in place with white glue. Finally, the car got a nice airbrush-weathering and is now ready for service on my railroad.

And work on the next project has already started. So stay tuned for next weeks update…

Bye, Gerd

[CFF] aux. tender “Moldovita” style (part1)

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 1 October 2019 with No Comments

Hello my friends,

many Romanian logging railroads used wood to fire the steam locos and since wood has a lower fuel value as coal, many locos used aux. tenders to enlarge the fuel capacity. For my railroad, I choosed the small 4-wheel tender used at the Moldovita forestry line. The prototype was rebuild multiple times and is still in service today for museum trains.

As the prototype, I used a regular logging truck for the chassis.

All the super structure was made from brass and steel. To determine the proportions, I used several photos from the internet, scaled to the correct size. BTW, I don’t try to create a 100% accurate model (which is at least not easy by all the different variations of the real thing).

All metal parts are soldered together and the sub-assemblies will get screwed to the chassis.

Next the parts will get sand-blasted and painted. More on the final touches will come next week.

[LVLC] Shay-Update

Posted by Gerd on Monday, 23 September 2019 with 1 Comment

Hello,

during the last months, my Louise Valley Lumber Co. acquired two 3-truck Shays for heavier log trains. Originally, both were “oil-burner” and got defined to be the “2nd generation” of motive power at the LVLC. Later, I converted both to coal-burner as I like the look of Shays with diamond stacks more than the “plain” oil-burner. But I was still not satisfied by the concept and the fact that I didn’t have enough capacity on my railroad to operate two 3-truck Shays as well as two different types of fuel.

So I took the advantage to sell my Bachmann 3-truck Shay and focus on my LGB/Aster es WSLC #12 engine. I spend a lot of effort to remove the oil bunker and replaced it by a load of fire wood. I also added an extra wood bunker to the tender, based on the Oregon Lumber Shay. Finally I added some details here and there as well as a diamond stack.

The last step was the weathering part. I wanted the new loco to match engines 4 & 5, which once got airbrush weathered by the late Mac McCalla. I met him a few times in person and I learned a lot from him about airbrush weathering. I was afraid in starting the project on such a big loco and especially with the goal to match the perfection of Mac’s work. At last, my fear was footless as the result shows. I also added a small tribute to Mac.

Since I sold the other 3-truck Shay, this one now got the final road number 6 and is now ready for service. I really like the new look of the engine. This is, how a hard-working Shay should look like in my opinion ;-)

Cheers, Gerd

[CFF] Resita 764-467 back in service

Posted by Gerd on Sunday, 15 September 2019 with 1 Comment

Hi folks,

after the crash of my Resita loco some weeks ago, it took only a few days to get the rough warp repaired, but it took several more days to get the loco back into perfect operational condition.

In the past days, I disassembled and re-assembled the loco several times, fixing many small issues from the crash and others. Finally, I managed to bring her back to perfect smooth operation.

This week, the Resita was in duty on a work train to ballast tracks.

Cheers, Gerd

[MLC] Running on our club layout

Posted by Gerd on Sunday, 8 September 2019 with 2 Comments

Hello followers,

this week, I like to share the photos from the August operation session on our club layout. I ran my whole 1:7.2 scaled log train and had a great day. Most time, I was the only “show train” running on the inner loop, so I was able to enjoy very slow speed running of my Shay locomotive, and even some special maneuvers like running in opposite direction and tender ahead.

I got additional support by my friend Tim, who also made most of the photos below.

Cheers, Gerd

[LVLC] Shay Days 2019

Posted by Gerd on Sunday, 1 September 2019 with 1 Comment

Hello Shay lovers,

on July 17th, Ephraim Shay would have celebrated his 180th birthday. His birthday is celebrated each year at Harbor Springs during the “Shay-Days”. I jumped on the event at my garden railroad and operated my live steam Shay with some ordinary supply and freight trains. Here’s a collection of photos, taken during the operation session.

[CFF] Resita is back on track

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 27 August 2019 with 1 Comment

Hi followers,

after the accident with my Resita loco, I’m glad to report her back on track and in operational condition. I was able to bend all warped parts straight and I even found the spare water side glass. I dismantled ans reassembled the loco two more times to fix several minor issues. After a proper setting and fine tuning, the loco performs well so far.

Unfortunately, I still have issues with steam by-passing the slide valve or piston, which narrows the fun of operation at the moment. My guess is, that there’s something with the displacement lubricator, as the loco needs very small amount of steam oil, compared to earlier operation. I’ll continue work on this issues and hopefully will solve it soon.

Gerd

[CFF] sad end of an operation session

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 20 August 2019 with 4 Comments

Hello,

last Sunday, I had my recently upgraded Resita out in the garden for some operation runs. Once finished, I stored all the rolling stock and went to bring the loco into my workshop, when the worst scenario happened. I still can’t tell how exactly, but the loco slid from my hand and crashed 4′ down to the paving, upright, engineers side cylinder first.

The impact of more than 5kg of steam loco caused huge damage to the whole loco. The marks at the cylinder clearly show the point of impact.

The overhead photo shows the bent housing, caused by the warped frame. The wheelsets are jamming and the loco doesn’t roll anymore.

In detail, 5 screws on the cylinder head sheered away by the twisting cover and the piston rod got bend right at the crosshead. The impact of the loco also break free the lead ballast weight at the back of the loco, which caused damage to the steam valve servo and destroyed the water sight glass. Additional, the rear boiler bracket is bent and some detail parts at the smokebox were broken off.

The frame got a bad “over corner” warp into some slight S-bend, bringing the head about 3mm out of the center.

As you can see on the photos, the loco already got dismantled for refurbishing. After the first shock moments, I’m confident to get her back into service soon.

[CFF] Klien-Lindner-axles for my Resita

Posted by Gerd on Thursday, 15 August 2019 with 2 Comments

Hello followers,

the past weeks were quite on my blog, but not in my workshop. Today, I like to show you the latest improvement and rebuild I spend to my Resita loco.

The prototype uses Klien-Lindner-axles and I was trying to equip my model loco with the same feature. The Klien-Lindner-axles allow the end axles of a steam loco to follow curves, improving the running on tight curved tracks. To show how this working on the prototype, I’ll explain my model version in detail, which is close to the prototype setup.

My model version was finally made from some 20mm round brass, 12x1mm copper tube, ball bearings, springs and brass balls. The brass ball original was a ball-nut and gut drilled and reamed to fit a the 4mm steel axle of the loco. Next the ball is hold in a four-jaw-chuck to drill a 2mm hole in exact 90° to the 4mm bore, halfway through. Once the ball is fit to the steel axle, a 2mm pin-screw will fit through the cross hole and will get screwed into the M2 cross-thread in the steel axle. The pin-screw should be long enough to provide a pin sticking from the ball acting as link to the copper pipe.

Next I cut two segments from 12x1mm copper tube, fitting exactly between the hubs of the wheels. Use the mill to cut a 2x7mm slot to the center of the pipe. This is where the pin from the brass ball will slide in, transporting the rotation from the steel axle to the copper tube and allowing the tube to slide 2.5mm to each side. The ends of the tube gut turned truth on the lathe to take 12x18x4 ball bearings. The brass collars are made from round brass-bar with 12mm bore and 17.5mm outer diameter. They are 9mm long with two M3 holes to take set-screws. Once the inner hub of the wheels are turned down to 12mm as well, the collars are used to mount the wheels on the copper tube. Check the correct gauge of the rebuild wheel sets. Don’t change the 8mm core-bore of the wheels. They will hold the centering springs and limit the angle-travel of the finished assembly.

To provide a self-centering of the hollow axle, we insert a spring on each side of the ball, pressing against the inside of the wheels. They will keep the hollow axle with the wheels centered above the ball when traveling on straight track. It also reduces the vertical move of the axles. Unfortunately, I have no photo from inserting the springs.

To guide the hollow axle into the curves, they are also supported by a drawbar just like a pony truck. There are several different versions used on the prototype locos and I was able to determine the one used on the Resita locos and tried to model it the same way. The housing is made on the lathe from 20mm round brass and milled to final shape. The housing is riding on the ball bearings to eliminate any friction. At one end, a 3mm steel rod is mounted which is guided in a frame-crossmember. I made theses cross members from steel sheet.

When the loco is rolling into a curve, the tracks will push the wheels to the side. While the hollow axle with the wheels is sliding, it is also hold/guided by the drawbar which will turn the sliding move also into a rotation. Finally, the wheels will keep in parallel with the rails through out the curved track. This reduces friction between wheels and rails and leads into better and smoother running. Once returning to straight track, the springs will push the wheel back into center position.

At least, here’s a video from first test runs after the rebuild.

Happy railroading, Gerd