[CFF] The beginning of my new Krauss loco

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 21 January 2020 with 3 Comments

In early 2019, I bought a used „Frank S.“ loco from LGB on eBay to model the HF110c loco of the French „Abreschviller logging railroad“. But soon I realized, that I was going to spread myself to far into different railroads topics, so I canceled the project just right in time. But what to do with already acquired loco? For a long time, I was also thinking about a battery powered steam loco to support my CFF Resita on the Romanian railroad. So, I bought spare parts from an LGB Austrian “U” loco (Zillertal) and sold not suitable parts from the HF110c (tender, cab and other parts).

I started with removing the counter weights from the cranks. I found piece of steel rod and made a sanding-jig to turn the counterweight cranks into simple cranks. The frame took some more work as I was going to replace the cylinders by those from the Zillertal-loco, which will add the typical “Krauss”-character to my new steam loco. I used photos of the real CFF 763-247 loco for reference. This loco was used on the Oituz and Commandau lines and features a 4-wheel bogie truck (4-6-0) which will not be covered on my freelanced model loco. Cutting the frame and valve gear support to fit the outside frame of the former HF110c was not easy but worked fine. The buffer beams on both ends are newly made from styrene and metal, equipped with my 3D-designed CFF couplers. I spend some more cutting on the top of the frame and added a new cab floor which is set on top of the original one to get the cab a little bit higher as before so suit the scale of 1:19 (16mm).

The rebuilt went well so far, so I proceed with the original boiler. The sand dome got removed as it will be replaced by a typical Krauss-model later. The new stack and spark arrestor were made on the lathe from steel. When drilling the whole in the smoke box to take the new stack, I had a small mishap when the drill braked out, but I’ll be able to fix that with putty later. I already started to fill attachment holes from former detail parts with putty.

But then, the whole project came to a stop for more than 6 months when I faced a big problem coming up: WHERE to place the batteries and HOW to exchange them? I use 4 LIPO-batteries (S4) with my actual 8 garden railroad locos, as I don’t run all the locos the same time and each battery will be used more frequently. Therefore, it’s necessary to take the batteries out of the locos for loading or to use them in another one. On my other locos, I can remove the tender shell or lift the top cover of those to get access to the battery, but there is no such container on my new Krauss loco.

A solution for this problem was found in late 2019, but this will become a new post somewhat later.

New year, new projects…

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 14 January 2020 with 4 Comments

Hello and welcome back here on my logging railroad blog.

I hope you had a good start into 2020 and I which you all the best and a happy new year.

This year will bring some new projects and ideas, but also some changes. After posting weekly on this blog, I’ll try monthly and/or progress-related posts this year. This might help me to spread my time better to all belongings in live as family, work and hobby, as I spend a lot of hobby-time for postings here on the blog.

End of last year, I started to reduce my collection by selling unfinished projects which were no longer needed, models wich were too much “compromise” and at least those models, which were just too much and not frequently used. These sales created a nice budget for upcoming projects.

Also last year, I scratch-build this Krauss loco for my Romanian logging railroad. I’ll show more of this loco in detail within one of the next posts together with some details how I build this loco, based on LGB parts.

Regards, Gerd

Christmas time -> Family time

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 26 November 2019 with 4 Comments

Hello my friends,

well, what happened to 2019? it’s nearly gone…

Coming Sunday, this years Xmas season will start and in the past years, this was the time when my workshop got a real boon in projects and models. Back in time, when I was attending the Livesteam Indoor Meet in Germany, I had a lot to organize during the end of the year and sometimes, I challenged even huge projects in a short time, like a whole new  turntable in 5″-gauge, build within a few days.

All of these projects didn’t happen if I didn’t get so much support by my wife and family. They gave me a lot of spare time to work on my models/projects and to let me attend on exhibitions, not always without head-shaking.

Therefore it’s the best time to say “Thanks” and I decided to keep the workshop closed during the next weeks, spending the whole time with my family. I wish you all a peaceful and happy Xmas-season. We’ll see/read us again next year.

Kind regards, your “Waldbahner” aka Gerd.

[CFF] “Moldovita” caboose (part 2)

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 12 November 2019 with 3 Comments

Well, the car is done…
And as in the first part, I don’t have photos of the building steps. If you’re interested in details, feel free to ask!

Once all the brass profiles were applied, I brush painted them black. The window framing got glued onto the plastic window-glazing first and the whole windows are than installed to the car. Additional details parts got added from plastic and metal parts to complete the car body. Last challenge became the roof, which was made from three separate bend segments soldered together. On the inside, the roof is inforced by two 10mm plywood arches. The roof is removable to show to the interior.

As usual, the car got its final transformation from “model car” to “logging railroad equipment” by the use of the airbrush. The third photo shows the interior I added. The door features working hinges and opens.

Last photos today are showing the latest models in service on the garden railroad.

Cheers, Gerd

[CFF] “Moldovita” caboose (part 1)

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 5 November 2019 with 2 Comments

After a short break, I’ll show you some progress on my next Moldovita based car. The line used a small 4-wheel caboose on their log trains and I always had a special favor for it. At least for its small size and octagonal body shape.

I checked my scrap box and found some 26mm wheelsets and OZARK journal/pedestals. Together with some brass profiles, the chassis was built within a few minutes. But than, it become much more difficult and complex…

Finally, it become so complex, that I missed to take photos during the build. The prototype seems to be built from a metal frame, planked with wooden boards from the inside. A very difficult design to use in 1:19 (16mm) scale. So I started to work out a sandwich-construction. Base for the car body is 2mm plywood, used for the floor and walls. They got screwed together with brass angles. Once the base was done, I glued thin wood planks to the car body and added more brass profiles to create the frame under the car.

Last challenge was to add the slim frame-work. I was pretty sure that glue would not hold them in place for long time, so I decided to “blind-solder” them from the back. the profiles are self made from 0.3mm brass sheet and I drilled holes through the brass and car body. Then I inserted brass nails from the inside, soldered them to the profiles on the outside and filed them flush. I think this will be the best way. I just finished one side, so I’ve to spend some more work to get all the brass profiles applied.

Short break

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 29 October 2019 (Comments Closed)

Hi folks,

I was very short in time for workshop and blog entries in the past weeks, due to several reasons. But now I’m back on track and already working on the next project. So hopefully there’ll be new content coming next week.

Thanks & regards, Gerd

[CFF] live stock on the railroad

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 15 October 2019 with 2 Comments

This week, I’ve just a small project.

Many logging railroads were used for much more as hauling logs. It also brought loggers and other “passengers” into the woods as well as food and supplies to the camps. But sometimes, they also worked simple as a “common carrier”.

Along my logging empire, there are some fresh meadows and a shepherd uses the railroad to bring the young sheep out into the woods. Therefore I build some side walls from wood strips, to be used with one of my flat cars to create a “stock car”.

Bye, Gerd

[CFF] aux. tender “Moldovita” style (part2)

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 8 October 2019 with 3 Comments

Here comes the second part of this small tender car. As announced last week, I spend a sand-blast and painted the body black. Once assembled, I soon realized, that something went wrong with proportions in height.

I checked some prototype photos and soon found out, that the roof on my car is 6mm to height. So I cut it down with Dremel-tool and soldered back on in the correct height. Much better. The split wood was made from real wood and glued in place with white glue. Finally, the car got a nice airbrush-weathering and is now ready for service on my railroad.

And work on the next project has already started. So stay tuned for next weeks update…

Bye, Gerd

[CFF] aux. tender “Moldovita” style (part1)

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 1 October 2019 (Comments Closed)

Hello my friends,

many Romanian logging railroads used wood to fire the steam locos and since wood has a lower fuel value as coal, many locos used aux. tenders to enlarge the fuel capacity. For my railroad, I choosed the small 4-wheel tender used at the Moldovita forestry line. The prototype was rebuild multiple times and is still in service today for museum trains.

As the prototype, I used a regular logging truck for the chassis.

All the super structure was made from brass and steel. To determine the proportions, I used several photos from the internet, scaled to the correct size. BTW, I don’t try to create a 100% accurate model (which is at least not easy by all the different variations of the real thing).

All metal parts are soldered together and the sub-assemblies will get screwed to the chassis.

Next the parts will get sand-blasted and painted. More on the final touches will come next week.

[LVLC] Shay-Update

Posted by Gerd on Monday, 23 September 2019 with 1 Comment

Hello,

during the last months, my Louise Valley Lumber Co. acquired two 3-truck Shays for heavier log trains. Originally, both were “oil-burner” and got defined to be the “2nd generation” of motive power at the LVLC. Later, I converted both to coal-burner as I like the look of Shays with diamond stacks more than the “plain” oil-burner. But I was still not satisfied by the concept and the fact that I didn’t have enough capacity on my railroad to operate two 3-truck Shays as well as two different types of fuel.

So I took the advantage to sell my Bachmann 3-truck Shay and focus on my LGB/Aster es WSLC #12 engine. I spend a lot of effort to remove the oil bunker and replaced it by a load of fire wood. I also added an extra wood bunker to the tender, based on the Oregon Lumber Shay. Finally I added some details here and there as well as a diamond stack.

The last step was the weathering part. I wanted the new loco to match engines 4 & 5, which once got airbrush weathered by the late Mac McCalla. I met him a few times in person and I learned a lot from him about airbrush weathering. I was afraid in starting the project on such a big loco and especially with the goal to match the perfection of Mac’s work. At last, my fear was footless as the result shows. I also added a small tribute to Mac.

Since I sold the other 3-truck Shay, this one now got the final road number 6 and is now ready for service. I really like the new look of the engine. This is, how a hard-working Shay should look like in my opinion ;-)

Cheers, Gerd