First page of the 2-inch scale railroad archive.

Everything around my 5″ gauge logging railroad

[MLC] Brakes for the disconnects

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 17 March 2020 with 1 Comment

Hello folks,

after a short break, I’m back to work on the brakes of my old 5″-gauge logging disconnects, which are in use as trucks under my new 42mm-scale logging cars.

Since I couldn’t find matching brake shoes in my scale, I decided to create my own. I had some brake shoes from my 1:20.3 railroad which I recreated in 1:7,2 scale for 3D-printing. As I was going to order 60 brake shoes, I was looking for a reliable price and finally decided to use PA-12 plastic which might be a no-go, but is a good compromise for me. All other parts are made from wood and steel as usual.

After painting the brake shoes black, made the wooden brake beams from beech. I used the milling machine to achieve the same shape to all 26 beams. Once stained to match the color of the old cars, I started to add the hardware.

One challenge was to find the matching hardware to attach the brake gear to the car frames. Finally I found metal pipe clamps and square-rings for carrying straps. As is needed several dozen pieces of each, I was happy to use ready-made parts.

The last photo above shows the direct comparison with and without brakes attached. It’s awesome how much such a detail can add to the overall look of a model, especially in such a large scale. Step-by-step my 12 years old toy-like disconnect design starts to turn into some realistic model train car.

In the next blog, I’ll continue with the brake rigging and gear.

[MLC] How I make multiple identical parts

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 25 February 2020 with 1 Comment

Hello,

this week, I like to share some techniques I use to make multiple identical parts for projects on my model trains. Instead of using modern laser cutting, I try the good old way when possible, as long as the number of parts needed is not to high.

Let’s start with a couple of sheet metal parts with special shapes and holes. I used 2mm thick flat bar and cut all parts to length on the metal bandsaw. Next I use double-sided sticker pads for photos and stick the parts together. When clamping them to the mill/drill-press, I use a piece of plywood to even out differences in the width of the parts. It’s important to clamp the parts very well, if possible also downwards, especially when mill cutting. It’s also best to use small and slow feed.

During the milling process, I used some round bars through the holes to keep all parts aligned properly. Once finished, the parts got parted with a knife and cleaned up. Some parts got also bend for the later assembly.

For some other parts, I make profile bars which got parted into the final pieces. Here I make ratches and pawls for disconnect car brake gear. By using the parting-tool/round-table I milled the shape step-by-step in multiple passes. Many years ago, I ordered such parts laser-cut and I used them as template to make additional parts to get the needed total.

Once the profiled bars are finished, I use a thin saw blade in the mill to cut them down into 4mm thick pieces.

You already see what I’m working on here and I’ll show you more about this project in the next post.

Bye, Gerd

[MLC] First operation of Forney #2 after overhaul

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 18 February 2020 with 4 Comments

Hello folks, after finishing the overhaul maintenance on the Forney, the next goal was a test run with some heavy train loads to check if the new-made smoke box door as well as the new seals are improving the performance of the loco. The best opportunity was given by the nearby “Dampflokfreunde Karlsruhe”. The track […]

[MLC] More overhaul work on Forney #2

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 11 February 2020 with 1 Comment

Hello folks, today I’ve some updates from my large-scale Moody Lumber. I spend some work on my Forney #2, since I had a list of overhaul-tasks for three winters now. Since I build and installed the new axle water pump, the loco is back in service, but I had issues with steam and fire during […]

[MLC] Running on our club layout

Posted by Gerd on Sunday, 8 September 2019 with 2 Comments

Hello followers, this week, I like to share the photos from the August operation session on our club layout. I ran my whole 1:7.2 scaled log train and had a great day. Most time, I was the only “show train” running on the inner loop, so I was able to enjoy very slow speed running […]

[MLC] New axle driven water pumps for Forney #2

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 11 June 2019 (Comments Closed)

Hello friends of the large steamers, since the last bigger maintenance 3 years ago, I had issues with the boiler water feed systems on the Forney, so the loco was not in service for the past two years, resting on the dead track. But a few weeks ago, I suddenly took the loco on my […]

[MLC] Equipment Flatcar & Boxcar

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 30 April 2019 with 1 Comment

Hello, here’s part 3 of the rolling stock rebuilt. First I ripped down my old tool & work car. The shack and open workbench got scrapped, while the detail parts got sorted. Those that are still useful and matching to the new scale got stored or added to the caboose interior. The new”Supply & Equpiment […]

[MLC] Rebuild of caboose #7 to 1:7-scale

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 23 April 2019 (Comments Closed)

And on we go…. the last week, I rebuild caboose #7 to the new scale of my 5″-gauge trains. When I build this caboose for my Bear Creek Lumber & Railroad, I had the unusual 4-wheel cabooses of the Uintah Railway in mind. So the tiny and low placed windows are coming from the Uintah […]

[MLC] Shay – Re-gaugeing the other way

Posted by Gerd on Wednesday, 17 April 2019 with 2 Comments

Hello, after I checked my other 5″-gauge rolling stock for useability in 1:7 scale as well (and they will look great, promised), I couldn’t wait to get the re-gaugeing started. Usually, re-gaugeing means the change of wheel-gauge on a loco, but in my case, I just cut the cab down to change the scale, which […]

[MLC] Measuring and calculating on my Shay

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 16 April 2019 (Comments Closed)

Hello my friends, when I looked at photos of my 2″-scaled live steam Shay in the past month, I interfered with the proportions of my loco, compared to typical Shay locos. To match the already existing rolling stock of my railroad, I build the Shay in 1:6-scale, as my back-in-time Bear Creek Lumber & Railroad […]