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[CFF] live stock on the railroad

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 15 October 2019 with 2 Comments

This week, I’ve just a small project.

Many logging railroads were used for much more as hauling logs. It also brought loggers and other “passengers” into the woods as well as food and supplies to the camps. But sometimes, they also worked simple as a “common carrier”.

Along my logging empire, there are some fresh meadows and a shepherd uses the railroad to bring the young sheep out into the woods. Therefore I build some side walls from wood strips, to be used with one of my flat cars to create a “stock car”.

Bye, Gerd

[CFF] aux. tender “Moldovita” style (part2)

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 8 October 2019 with 3 Comments

Here comes the second part of this small tender car. As announced last week, I spend a sand-blast and painted the body black. Once assembled, I soon realized, that something went wrong with proportions in height.

I checked some prototype photos and soon found out, that the roof on my car is 6mm to height. So I cut it down with Dremel-tool and soldered back on in the correct height. Much better. The split wood was made from real wood and glued in place with white glue. Finally, the car got a nice airbrush-weathering and is now ready for service on my railroad.

And work on the next project has already started. So stay tuned for next weeks update…

Bye, Gerd

[CFF] aux. tender “Moldovita” style (part1)

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 1 October 2019 with No Comments

Hello my friends,

many Romanian logging railroads used wood to fire the steam locos and since wood has a lower fuel value as coal, many locos used aux. tenders to enlarge the fuel capacity. For my railroad, I choosed the small 4-wheel tender used at the Moldovita forestry line. The prototype was rebuild multiple times and is still in service today for museum trains.

As the prototype, I used a regular logging truck for the chassis.

All the super structure was made from brass and steel. To determine the proportions, I used several photos from the internet, scaled to the correct size. BTW, I don’t try to create a 100% accurate model (which is at least not easy by all the different variations of the real thing).

All metal parts are soldered together and the sub-assemblies will get screwed to the chassis.

Next the parts will get sand-blasted and painted. More on the final touches will come next week.