[LVLC] New freight cars for my garden railroad

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 14 July 2020 with 1 Comment

Hi folks,

since my very-large-scale projects are finished, I’ve time to add some more cars in regular-large-scale to my roster, talking about 1:20,3-scale.

My Louise Valley Lumber Co. is going to install a logging camp up in the mountains and is in need of some additional freight cars to serve the camps.

The basic frame is made from 4mm plywood. All timbers for the frame are cut from scrap wood on the bandsaw.

The basic construction is the same as on the existing cars. This way they will match nicely into the roster once finished. The mounts for the trucks are made from brass and other metal parts.

The slots for the Kadee couplers were cut afterwards on the mill to center them correctly. I finally applied some wood-stain, but grabbed the wrong color. It might be to dark for later weathering, as I like to finish them the same way as the other cars.

[MLC] Gondola #17 & stakes

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 7 July 2020 with 2 Comments

Hi folks,

another week has passed and here’s fresh painted Gondola #17 ready for first service.

I also made a couple of stakes for my flatcars. the short ones are used as stop blocks when hauling logs on the flatcars. I made 20 of them, to equip each car with 4 such stakes.

To make things easier, I used ready cut square-timbers and “dowel-glued” them to twigs. This went much faster then trying to cut the twigs to matching size.

Additional, I made a full set of long stakes.

Having completed my Flatcars rebuilds, I’ll switch back to the smaller large scale, meaning 45mm gauge. I’ve some new equipment for the Louise Valley Lumber in the works and I also plan a new loco-building-project starting this summer, incl. a whole new railroad company.

[MLC] Gondola #18

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 30 June 2020 with 2 Comments

While the flatcars are done, it’s time to start another project, which got postbonded several times in the past. Building a set of Gondola walls to fit on one of the flatcars.

So I ordered screws and nuts and bought some timber from the DIY store. Usually I cut my own timbers from cheap roof battens. Anyway, I couldn’t wait to start so I spend some money and bought ready cut timbers :-)

The side walls are hold by the new stake pockets while the end walls are guided in channels at each end of the sidewalls. This way it’s easy to remove the walls if I’m in need of another flatcar and they will need small space for storage.

I’m so happy with the look of the new car, that I immediately decided to build another set. I should have enough material on stock.

Cheers, Gerd

[MLC] Flatcars part 2

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 23 June 2020 (Comments Closed)

Hi folks,

within the last days, I finished the upgrade on all flatcars.

In between, I spend a day at the club layout in Karlsruhe to run a short freight train with Shay #2. Together with a good friend, we made point-to-point operation on single track with halfway passing siding and time table. It was a lot of fun and I look forward to tell more about this after one of the next sessions.

Regards, Gerd

[MLC] Further improvments to my logging flatcars

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 16 June 2020 with 1 Comment

Hi,

after upgrading the old disconnects with functional brakes at the beginning of the year, I decided to spend an upgrade on the flat cars as well.

The design was quickly created from a few roof battens and hardware from the DIY-store. Especially the origin stake pockets didn’t fit well, especially since I changed the scale. So I made a new, more prototypical design in 3D and ordered them printed in PA-plastic as I did with the brake shoes.

I started with painting the new parts in freight-car-brown. A bigger challenge was to fond the correct spacing as well as the final rebuild of the cars. First I removed the old pockets and screws. I plugged the holes with wood dowels and painted them over.

Since the deck boards are wider than the frame. I had to made cutouts above the new pockets. Fortunately, this was easy doing with a Japanese saw and fretsaw.

The new holders, now 6 on each side, were then assembled with short bolts and square nuts. The difference is significant and the cars won by character and prototype-plausibility.

The other 4 cars will be converted next. Afterwards, I might start with a set of Gondola-sides for one of the flatcars which is on my wish-list for a long time.

Regards, Gerd

[MLC] Tree faller saws and peaveys

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 9 June 2020 with 3 Comments

Hello logging railroaders,

what would be a logging railroad without loggers and their tools? As I model in a scale of 1:7.2 (42mm scale) I’ve to build most of the details parts on my own as well.

Today we’ll start with a pair of peaveys, used to handle and load logs in the woods. The needed parts are made from steel by using the lathe, milling machine, angle grinder and files.

To get the trees down, I made also two faller saws from a real saw-blade and some husks to hold the handles. These parts are soft-soldered, which is strong enough for “detail-display-use”.

Anyhow, all these tools are fully functional. This will become a bit more difficult when making axles. Therefore I’ll show you the latest upgrades on my logging flatcars next week ;-)

Gerd

[MLC] A day on Shay – Operating the Sisyphos-Logging-Branch

Posted by Gerd on Thursday, 4 June 2020 (Comments Closed)

It’s finally complete. This might be the longest and most complex video so far. I hope you’ll enjoy ; -)

My new keyboard

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 2 June 2020 with 3 Comments

Are you in trouble and need good arguments for your honey, why garden railroad trains are useful and handy? Well, here’s a genius life-hack for you:

I proudly present “Logging railroader’s keyboard”.

Well, it’s finally a joke to fill a gap here in my blog. I’m working on some bigger projects recently and didn’t find the time to write new postings for the blog yet. But I’ll please you with some 20+ minutes of video coming soon. Promised ;-)

Cheers, Gerd

[LVLC] Into the woods with Shay #1

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 26 May 2020 with 3 Comments

Hello followers,

today, I’ll show you one kind of operation concept that I use for my US style logging railroad on my garden railroad layout.

First some fictional facts for today:
– The mainline between Ronja Springs and the wye is called to be a steep grade, which allows only 4 logcars per train.
– The upper section in the lawn is more or less “flat” and the Shay can lead trains with 8 logcars.

So let’s get started at “Ronja Springs” in the very early morning with the first train heading up the hill to the wye and camp at “Tinker Meadows”.

At the wye, out train takes the right-hand track and reaches “Deadwood” siding, where a loaded string of 4 cars is resting from yesterday evening. Shay #1 pushes the loaded cars out of the siding and heads back to pick up the caboose from the string of empties. Once the loaded train is ready, the loco heads back to Ronja Springs with the first load.

Back at “Ronja Springs”, a box car gets prepared for the next train of empty cars, to bring goods to the camp at “Tinker Meadows”. While the box car is loaded at the freight depot, Shay swaps the log cars at the log dump.

Finally, our train heads uphill for the second time this morning. This time, the train takes the left leg at the wye, but drops the logcar at the wye for now. Our loco pushes the box car over to the other mainline to “Deadwood” first.

Here the loco picks up the empty cars from the first run and couples the box car to the end of the consist. Back at the wye of “Tinker Meadows”, the box car is placed at the camp for unloading. Next, Shay #1 proceeds to today’s destination with a double string of 8 logcars in total.

Today, we’re heading for the log landing near “Camp 24”. As the logging spur is rather short, the long train of empties is brought to another siding named “Lilly Fork” where the train gets split in half again.

Each single string of empties is now pushed into the loading spur. The siding at “Lilly Fork” is used to handle the strings of log cars. Before the train will depart for the return trip, the Shay is turned on a wye just behind “Lilly Fork”.

When the train reaches “Tinker Meadows”, 4 loaded cars get dropped at the siding of “Deadwood” for a later trip to the mill. The boxcar is empty by now and will return to “Ronja Springs”. Please not also, that the loco will get turned again at the wye, to run backwards down the steep grade ahead.

Back in “Ronja Springs”, the empty boxcar get pushed to a side spur, before the log car are brought to the mill pond. The first load of logs is already dumped and the string of empties is waiting for the next run into the woods.

Meanwhile, it’s high noon and the loco crew is taking lunch at the freight depot. Afterwards, the loco will proceed the same procedure a second time during the afternoon.

The operation concept shown here is inspired by the operation of the West Side Lumber Company, where 6 Shays were busy the whole day to deliver 76 loaded logcars to the mill in 4 trains of 19 cars each.

I’ve to admit, that I don’t use this concept for every day’s operation. More often I use a regular way. But it shows how much operation can be handled even on such a simple and small layout. Finally, it’s just fun to dump a crate of logs somewhere along the mainline and to haul them down to “the mill” by train.

Having said that, it’s Monday eve 7pm by now… I think I’ll go out make good use of the last hour of daylight for today ;-)

[CFF] The final touch on my Krauss loco

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 19 May 2020 with 3 Comments

Hello folks,

when I checked the photos for last weeks episode, I got bothered by the first photo below, showing a bright shining Krauss loco beside my other “well-used” rolling stock. Even if my freelanced Krauss loco is well done, something very important was still missing all the time.

The solution sounds simple, but takes several hours of work too. I took out the airbrush and spend a stiff weathering together with some detail parts for decoration. This turned the new loco in a real work-horse of backwoods railroading.

I for myself like her much more this way. I’m also very happy with the result, as I had to fight some problems during the process. Also new are some parts on the loco as the oil-pump above the eginieers side cylinder and the drain cocks.

So let’s go out in the garden and watch her in action.