[LVLC] Shay Days 2019

Posted by Gerd on Sunday, 1 September 2019 with 1 Comment

Hello Shay lovers,

on July 17th, Ephraim Shay would have celebrated his 180th birthday. His birthday is celebrated each year at Harbor Springs during the “Shay-Days”. I jumped on the event at my garden railroad and operated my live steam Shay with some ordinary supply and freight trains. Here’s a collection of photos, taken during the operation session.

[CFF] Resita is back on track

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 27 August 2019 with 1 Comment

Hi followers,

after the accident with my Resita loco, I’m glad to report her back on track and in operational condition. I was able to bend all warped parts straight and I even found the spare water side glass. I dismantled ans reassembled the loco two more times to fix several minor issues. After a proper setting and fine tuning, the loco performs well so far.

Unfortunately, I still have issues with steam by-passing the slide valve or piston, which narrows the fun of operation at the moment. My guess is, that there’s something with the displacement lubricator, as the loco needs very small amount of steam oil, compared to earlier operation. I’ll continue work on this issues and hopefully will solve it soon.

Gerd

[CFF] sad end of an operation session

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 20 August 2019 with 4 Comments

Hello,

last Sunday, I had my recently upgraded Resita out in the garden for some operation runs. Once finished, I stored all the rolling stock and went to bring the loco into my workshop, when the worst scenario happened. I still can’t tell how exactly, but the loco slid from my hand and crashed 4′ down to the paving, upright, engineers side cylinder first.

The impact of more than 5kg of steam loco caused huge damage to the whole loco. The marks at the cylinder clearly show the point of impact.

The overhead photo shows the bent housing, caused by the warped frame. The wheelsets are jamming and the loco doesn’t roll anymore.

In detail, 5 screws on the cylinder head sheered away by the twisting cover and the piston rod got bend right at the crosshead. The impact of the loco also break free the lead ballast weight at the back of the loco, which caused damage to the steam valve servo and destroyed the water sight glass. Additional, the rear boiler bracket is bent and some detail parts at the smokebox were broken off.

The frame got a bad “over corner” warp into some slight S-bend, bringing the head about 3mm out of the center.

As you can see on the photos, the loco already got dismantled for refurbishing. After the first shock moments, I’m confident to get her back into service soon.

[CFF] Klien-Lindner-axles for my Resita

Posted by Gerd on Thursday, 15 August 2019 with 2 Comments

Hello followers,

the past weeks were quite on my blog, but not in my workshop. Today, I like to show you the latest improvement and rebuild I spend to my Resita loco.

The prototype uses Klien-Lindner-axles and I was trying to equip my model loco with the same feature. The Klien-Lindner-axles allow the end axles of a steam loco to follow curves, improving the running on tight curved tracks. To show how this working on the prototype, I’ll explain my model version in detail, which is close to the prototype setup.

My model version was finally made from some 20mm round brass, 12x1mm copper tube, ball bearings, springs and brass balls. The brass ball original was a ball-nut and gut drilled and reamed to fit a the 4mm steel axle of the loco. Next the ball is hold in a four-jaw-chuck to drill a 2mm hole in exact 90° to the 4mm bore, halfway through. Once the ball is fit to the steel axle, a 2mm pin-screw will fit through the cross hole and will get screwed into the M2 cross-thread in the steel axle. The pin-screw should be long enough to provide a pin sticking from the ball acting as link to the copper pipe.

Next I cut two segments from 12x1mm copper tube, fitting exactly between the hubs of the wheels. Use the mill to cut a 2x7mm slot to the center of the pipe. This is where the pin from the brass ball will slide in, transporting the rotation from the steel axle to the copper tube and allowing the tube to slide 2.5mm to each side. The ends of the tube gut turned truth on the lathe to take 12x18x4 ball bearings. The brass collars are made from round brass-bar with 12mm bore and 17.5mm outer diameter. They are 9mm long with two M3 holes to take set-screws. Once the inner hub of the wheels are turned down to 12mm as well, the collars are used to mount the wheels on the copper tube. Check the correct gauge of the rebuild wheel sets. Don’t change the 8mm core-bore of the wheels. They will hold the centering springs and limit the angle-travel of the finished assembly.

To provide a self-centering of the hollow axle, we insert a spring on each side of the ball, pressing against the inside of the wheels. They will keep the hollow axle with the wheels centered above the ball when traveling on straight track. It also reduces the vertical move of the axles. Unfortunately, I have no photo from inserting the springs.

To guide the hollow axle into the curves, they are also supported by a drawbar just like a pony truck. There are several different versions used on the prototype locos and I was able to determine the one used on the Resita locos and tried to model it the same way. The housing is made on the lathe from 20mm round brass and milled to final shape. The housing is riding on the ball bearings to eliminate any friction. At one end, a 3mm steel rod is mounted which is guided in a frame-crossmember. I made theses cross members from steel sheet.

When the loco is rolling into a curve, the tracks will push the wheels to the side. While the hollow axle with the wheels is sliding, it is also hold/guided by the drawbar which will turn the sliding move also into a rotation. Finally, the wheels will keep in parallel with the rails through out the curved track. This reduces friction between wheels and rails and leads into better and smoother running. Once returning to straight track, the springs will push the wheel back into center position.

At least, here’s a video from first test runs after the rebuild.

Happy railroading, Gerd

Recent news

Posted by Gerd on Thursday, 1 August 2019 with 1 Comment

Hello followers,

it was planned to exhibit my Hon30-layout during the 50 anniversary of the logging railroad of Abreschviller (France). Unfortunately, I’ll not be able to attend the show.

Never the less, my friend Bernd will be there with his modular layout which is build in the same manner as my layout.

Over all, all my logging railroad modeling came to a stop at the moment. I look forward to shoe you some new content after the summer break.

Until then, keep smiling and enjoy your model trains.

Gerd

[Garden Railroad] Veggi-Train

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 9 July 2019 with 2 Comments

Hi garden railroad friends,

who ever thought a garden railroad is nonsense… here’s the counter-proof ;-)

The first seed in my wifes raised gardening bed has grown fruits for the first home-grown salad, we harvested some lettuce, radishes and finger-carrots. And while there are some tracks right in front of the bed, the veggies got loaded to one of Ronja’s Playmobil trains to get hauled down the line to Ronja Springs.

Cheers, Gerd

[Garden Railroad]

Posted by Gerd on Thursday, 4 July 2019 with 1 Comment

Hi folks,

as shown in my new video a few days ago, I finished the mainline on my garden railroad. Shay #7 got the honor to deliver the last section of track, including the “golden rail joiner” to close the loop in the upper garden.

I spend a lot of thoughts for the final route, but finally I discarded any plan which routes the track behind the garden shed. Weeds would overgrow the tracks very quick and there’s only bad access to this section. So I decided to cross the lawn in front of the garden shed. This reduced the track length of the loop by approx. 10 meters, but one can simple add another lap before returning to the rail station.

For the moment, this simple track layout gives me plenty of possibilities for real logging railroad operations. Never the less, I also have ideas to add another siding or spur track to place a logging camp, which will provide some more operation, especially for freight cars. And I still have some tracks left ;-)

[garden railroad + CFF] Romanian logging trains

Posted by Gerd on Monday, 1 July 2019 with 3 Comments

Hello,

a few days ago, I finished my garden railroad nearly by accident. I took me some while to find the final track plan, but once chosen, the tracks were laid within two days. I look forward to post a more detailed blog article soon.

Anyhow, here’s a new movie from my railroad, not only showing the new sections of track but also possible operations as point-to-point logging railroad.
Actually, this video is available in German only.

Gerd

[Garden Railroad] More progress done…

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 18 June 2019 (Comments Closed)

Hello garden railroaders,

it’S time to share some hews from my garden railroad. First of all, I operated some trains with my 3-truck Shays. Since I finished the new log cars, I can run two full trains.

Last time, I extended the tracks on the left of the garden and now the rails have reached the raised garden bed.

The new stretch of track was tested immediately by the railroads president. The collection of horses is also happy to have easy access to the fresh and green northern willows ;-)

Later I added some garden bed edge stones along the line. That’s where we’ll grow tomatoes and zucchini.

The last idea was to lead the track around the garden shed and back to the wye. But in the meantime, I noticed that it will be difficult to keep the tracks clean and access to that area will be limited, especially when there are running tracks through the narrow pathway. Therefore I’m no looking for alternative routes. That’s one of the very special aspects on garden railroads, when it needs real track survey to deal with grades and space.

[MLC] New axle driven water pumps for Forney #2

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 11 June 2019 (Comments Closed)

Hello friends of the large steamers,

since the last bigger maintenance 3 years ago, I had issues with the boiler water feed systems on the Forney, so the loco was not in service for the past two years, resting on the dead track.

But a few weeks ago, I suddenly took the loco on my workbench and started to assemble the loco down to the frame.

As the original pump got lost, I simply build a whole new one. First I had to add new eccentric rings to the second axle. This needs to me to remove the whole axle. Finally everything was much easier than expected.

The parts for the pump were made from stock brass on the mill and lathe. The single parts for the pump body were soldered to a single unit. I use a high temperature soft solder which is strong enough for such tasks.

To have easy access for maintenance, the pump is hold in place by a single screw. Once loose, I can take the pump out of the frame to the cutout section in the bottom of the former water tank. Last task was to rebuild all necessary water pipes for the axle pump including the bypass back to the tender tank.

The first test run at home was very successful.

So next I headed for a local club layout on June 2nd for a long-term test run. The loco performed great for more than 5 hours and is now back in full operational condition. This makes me really proud, as the loco is already 36 years old, but still not tired.

Originally, I planed to rebuild the Forney for 1:7.2 scale as well as I did with my other rolling stock recently. But in the end, I can’t get warm with the 1:7.2 proportions on this loco. So I decided to keep here in 1:6 scale for the moment and gave her on loan to a sugar cane railroad.