[Garden Railroad] Trees in the garden

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 28 April 2020 with 7 Comments

Hello folks,

I got some remarks, that my “forestry railroad” is missing trees. As my wife has reorganized the flower boxes along the house, I was able to get two small conifers, which got planted at the wye. One of them was very dry, let’s wait if it will come back to live.

When we moved two our new home, we also moved some concrete planters from the old yard. One of them was already home of another conifer, which might fear any gardener. But this tree was a perfect match for the wye in my eyes. So I removed the tree from the planter with heavy equipment and placed right into the center of the wye. This gives the whole scene a totally new look and the wye turned into a beloved photo spot.

Since trees are growing at the wye, the other side looks more like a dead-end. What’s going on here?

Cheers, Gerd

[CFF] spring operation sessions

Posted by Gerd on Thursday, 23 April 2020 with 3 Comments

Hello folks,

here are some photos of this springs Romanian railroad action on my garden railroad.

Some of the pictures are actually “historic” since I started some rebuild this week on the upper section of the railroad. Details may follow here on the blog next week.

Bye, Gerd

[Garden Railroad] Aerial view of my garden railroad

Posted by Gerd on Thursday, 16 April 2020 with 6 Comments

Hello,

since I started with my garden railroad, I had the idea to make an aerial view video from the roof above the terrace. As our tree in the garden got trimmed last week, this was the best time to make the movie.

Cheers, Gerd

[MLC] Brake rigging and final assembly

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 14 April 2020 with 3 Comments

Hi logging railroaders,

today, I like to share the last part of the brake installment on my 5″-gauge rolling stock. The last report featured the brake beams and shoes, now it’s time to get them connected to the brake gear. To determine the length of the brake rigging, I used threaded rods first. The final pieces are made from 4mm-rods with fork heads attached.

The force of the brake gear is transferred by a short length of chain to the draw-rod which is leading to the rear (inner) brake beam. The link attached to the brake beam reverses the force also to pull the front brake beam against the axle the same time via the lower connecting rod. The second link is anchored against the frame at its top. I added a small pull-spring near the interchange between the chain to the draw-rod to ensure proper brake release. The last photo above shows the final brake gear parts in progress.

The next set of photos shows first test’s during the initial construction phase. Even one single braked truck can hold the car on step grades, even with heavy load, which will be shown later. It’s also possible to apply the brakes on a grade under heavy load.

The final version of the brake gear features a square head to take so-called “Hickeys”. These were huge square keys, used by the brakeman to set the brakes individual on each disconnect. As the Moody Lumber uses the former disconnects as trucks below flatcars, I also made brake wheels with rods, which can be attached by a short threaded pin. This way it’s easy to remove the brake wheels for storage and transport of the cars, or when using the trucks as disconnects again.

As shown in the past blog posts, I used serial-construction for nearly any parts, to produce 13 set’s of full brake gear the same time. Beside the twelve disconnects, I also equipped my caboose with this new brake design. The caboose already featured working brakes, but those were very crude and not as detailed as the new one.

Now to the final question: How good is the new brake system? I made a short video showing the brake in action. The grade is set to 4% in this clip.

At least, I finished all the rolling stock rebuild for my Moody Lumber Company so far. All cars are now re-scaled to 1:7.2-scale, are equipped with working brakes and additional details. Once my Shay is repaired and back in service, all my 5″-gauge rolling stock is finally ready for the new season.

See you next time, Gerd

Thumb up-date

Posted by Gerd on Saturday, 11 April 2020 with 5 Comments

Hi folks,

just a short update to you, that my thumb is recovering well. There has been no dramatic injury to the inner parts, but I lost most of the thumb-nail so far. But it looks good, that the nail will recover in full size as well during the next 6-12 month.

So next post will hopefully finish the brake-gear-documentation on my 5″-gauge rolling stock. I already used the good weather in the past days to run some trains on the 45mm-gauge garden track and there are also changes upcoming to my Hon30 layout.

So stay tuned for further updates here on my blog, hopefully starting next week.
Until than, I wish you all Happy Easter, stay home, stay save, keep your fingers out of power tools and enjoy your model trains ;-)

Gerd

Dooh !!

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 24 March 2020 with 8 Comments

Hello my friends,

on the agenda for this week was the final report about the hand brakes on my disconnects. But unfortunately, something came in between… Or more in detail, my thumb came in between the workpiece and mill…

But don’t worry, the wound is clean and cures well so far. But it would be good for me to keep slow for some while.

Best regards, stay at home, stay healthy, enjoy your model trains, and watch your fingers ;-)

Your Waldbahner.

[MLC] Brakes for the disconnects

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 17 March 2020 with 1 Comment

Hello folks,

after a short break, I’m back to work on the brakes of my old 5″-gauge logging disconnects, which are in use as trucks under my new 42mm-scale logging cars.

Since I couldn’t find matching brake shoes in my scale, I decided to create my own. I had some brake shoes from my 1:20.3 railroad which I recreated in 1:7,2 scale for 3D-printing. As I was going to order 60 brake shoes, I was looking for a reliable price and finally decided to use PA-12 plastic which might be a no-go, but is a good compromise for me. All other parts are made from wood and steel as usual.

After painting the brake shoes black, made the wooden brake beams from beech. I used the milling machine to achieve the same shape to all 26 beams. Once stained to match the color of the old cars, I started to add the hardware.

One challenge was to find the matching hardware to attach the brake gear to the car frames. Finally I found metal pipe clamps and square-rings for carrying straps. As is needed several dozen pieces of each, I was happy to use ready-made parts.

The last photo above shows the direct comparison with and without brakes attached. It’s awesome how much such a detail can add to the overall look of a model, especially in such a large scale. Step-by-step my 12 years old toy-like disconnect design starts to turn into some realistic model train car.

In the next blog, I’ll continue with the brake rigging and gear.

[LVLC] First MoW train on the garden railroad

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 10 March 2020 with 3 Comments

Hello garden railroaders,

last weekend, Shay #6 headed out into the woods with a short MoW train. After the winter break, the MoW crew was looking for bad spots on the main line which will need repairs before the new season will start. Fortunately, there are only small issues along the tracks. Additional, the track gang made surveys for new track extensions which might be build this year as well to reach new stands of fresh timber. So stay tuned for later updates during the year.

When the train returned in the late afternoon, the Shay was turned on the wye before heading down to Ronja Springs.

Regards, Gerd

[MLC] How I make multiple identical parts

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 25 February 2020 with 1 Comment

Hello,

this week, I like to share some techniques I use to make multiple identical parts for projects on my model trains. Instead of using modern laser cutting, I try the good old way when possible, as long as the number of parts needed is not to high.

Let’s start with a couple of sheet metal parts with special shapes and holes. I used 2mm thick flat bar and cut all parts to length on the metal bandsaw. Next I use double-sided sticker pads for photos and stick the parts together. When clamping them to the mill/drill-press, I use a piece of plywood to even out differences in the width of the parts. It’s important to clamp the parts very well, if possible also downwards, especially when mill cutting. It’s also best to use small and slow feed.

During the milling process, I used some round bars through the holes to keep all parts aligned properly. Once finished, the parts got parted with a knife and cleaned up. Some parts got also bend for the later assembly.

For some other parts, I make profile bars which got parted into the final pieces. Here I make ratches and pawls for disconnect car brake gear. By using the parting-tool/round-table I milled the shape step-by-step in multiple passes. Many years ago, I ordered such parts laser-cut and I used them as template to make additional parts to get the needed total.

Once the profiled bars are finished, I use a thin saw blade in the mill to cut them down into 4mm thick pieces.

You already see what I’m working on here and I’ll show you more about this project in the next post.

Bye, Gerd

[MLC] First operation of Forney #2 after overhaul

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 18 February 2020 with 4 Comments

Hello folks,

after finishing the overhaul maintenance on the Forney, the next goal was a test run with some heavy train loads to check if the new-made smoke box door as well as the new seals are improving the performance of the loco.

The best opportunity was given by the nearby “Dampflokfreunde Karlsruhe”. The track gang has rebuild the road bed on a 400′ long section and now it was time to bring in ballast and new track panels.

The little Forney hauled round about 3.5tons of ballast as well as several 8′ long track panels to the working side. Over all, the loco performed great with a good and strong pull. Looks that the loco is back in full working condition.

Cheers, Gerd