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[YPLC] The “Yellow Pine Lumber Company”

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 25 May 2021 with 4 Comments

Howdy folks,

as this layout features some special feature, I decided to present you the final layout today. Once you know the final details, this movie might become somewhat unspectacular. Enjoy!!

The Yellow Pine Lumber Co. was founded in 1894 at Hoffman in North Carolina. The railroad operated two lines. The first one down into the south, later a new line to the north east was build. The original ROW is still visible in form of roads today. This railroad operated on the rare gauge of 30″ and owned one of only two 30″-gauge Shays in the Sandhills region. Therefore, this was a perfect match for my little Toma Shay.

As usual, my micro layout is dedicated to the prototype, but no accurate model of any prototype situation.

Cheers, Gerd

[Gazette] Timberroads – Details, Prototypes, References

Posted by Gerd on Friday, 21 May 2021 with 2 Comments

Hi folks,

I got some requests about references and details for timber roads. Therefore I made this gazette issue with the details I researched. I posted references to the websites where I got my info from and also hints to other books to this topic.

I came to this type of railroad during research of a prototype loco of my Toma Shay in Hon30. Actually, wooden rails were not new to me, but I never spend so many research before.

Anyway, while looking for 13 Ton Shays as my Toma Shay, I found the following photos.

Lima Shop# 172 – “Bishop Lumber Co.”

Lima Shop# 174 – “Jones, S. A. & Son”

Lima Shop# 191 – “Dixon Sawmill”

Lima Shop# 289 – “Leavitt & Leavitt #4”

Lima Shop# 628 – “Warnell Lumber & Veneer Co. #2”

These locos operated on wooden rails as can be seen on the photos or found in the description of Lima records. For use on wooden rails, such locos were equipped with extra wide tires and deep flanges, which are good visible on Shay #174.

Based on the loco above, I spend some more research at www.shaylocomotives.com and www. gearedsteam.com, resulting in the following list of Lima shop numbers. Judging by records or photographs, these locos operated on wooden rails.

#57, #89, #168, #172, #174, #191, #196, #254, #289, #290, #300, #403, #434, #433, #439, #469, #477, #516, #617, #628

Most of such locos were 13 ton classes. #57 might be the smallest with 7 tons while biggest loco weights 17 tons (#628). Gauge varies between 30″ and std.gauge (#191).
A special loco is #254, which is listed with 60″ gauge and seems to be build for operation on so pole-roads, which used full logs instead of sawn timber for rails. Usually, this was a territory for Climax locos and not for Shays.

But how about the tramroad timber rails? Here I found a good article about the D. H. Eastin & Company.

This railroad used tiny Shay #57 and operated for approx. 10 years. The link above features some photos which shows details on the track as well. Halfway down the article is a photo of a small section of track which has survived into our times and gives detailed information. The rails were made of two layers of hardwood timbers, each 2×5″, bolted on top of each other with overlap. Usually, there were wooden bolts and pins used, to avoid damage to the wheels. This results in a 4″ high and 6″ wide rail head. On some railroads, stripes of thin metal were added on top of the timber rails. Even turnouts were not uncommon with timber rails. Remember the D.H.Eastin&Co above, which operated several switchbacks on their railroad. Most timber turnouts wer21e built as stub-switches and often with switchable frogs. Unfortunately, I only found very few photos in books, which cannot be shared here.

For more details and information, I can recommend the book series “Railroading in the Carolina Sandhills”, which features many small tramroads like the “Yellow Pine Lbr.Co.”.

If you have further questions, feel free to ask, Maybe I can help.
Bye, Gerd

[YLPC] Scratchbuild Water tower

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 18 May 2021 with 2 Comments

Hi folks,

while adding landscape scenery, I came to the idea to add a small water tower for the Shay locomotive. I collected some scrap wood and called my dad to 3D print his On30 water spout in half size. Base of the tank is piece of round wood, bored on the lathe to get a hollow tank. A matching disc from clear acrylic will create the water surface.

The scribed wood came with the sawmill kit was left over. I added some bands from 0.4mm wire. The trestle bends to rise the tank were built from strip wood as well.

Finally, I added some Woodland Water-Effects to the acrylic disc in the tank and of courste some slight weathering. In my opinion, the water tank is a great addition. BTW, the spout can be lowered and is connected to the counterweight by a thin thread.

Cheers, Gerd

[YLPC] Sawmill second part

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 11 May 2021 with 6 Comments

Welcome back to the second part. The sawmill got placed on the first segment. The ties for the further tramroad are also placed into the sandy ground of the Sandhills. With the mill in place, I started to add the final components and details. To add the roofs, I used 0.4mm plywood instead of cardboard […]

[YPLC] A new timber railroad adventure just begins

Posted by Gerd on Tuesday, 4 May 2021 with 2 Comments

Hi folks, after many ideas and withdrawn plans, I finally found a way to build a timber-tramroad layout to run my little Toma-Shay. The layout is designed in 3 segments and will show a fresh started logging operation in the late 19th centuray, out in the Carolina Sandhills. I found an old diecast kit of […]